High Speed AFM

JKU - Johannes Kepler University Linz

Linz | Website

Large equipment

Short Description

Filming dynamic biological processes in real-time at nanometer resolution

Contact Person

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Peter Hinterdorfer

Research Services

Watching dynamical structural changes in real time at Nanometer resolution, such as the bi-pedal ‘walking mechanism’ of antibodies on bacterial and viral membranes [ref. 1], as well as filming the thermal motion of membrane protein moieties [ref. 2]. The major expected long-term impact is to arrive at a detailed dynamic and functional picture in understanding the binding and transport mechanism of substrates and pharmaceuticals.

Methods & Expertise for Research Infrastructure

watching dynamical structural changes in real time, such as the bi-pedal ‘walking mechanism’ of antibodies on bacterial and viral membranes, as well as filming the thermal motion of membrane protein moieties. The major expected long-term impact is to arrive at a detailed dynamic and functional picture in understanding the binding and transport mechanism of substrates and pharmaceuticals to aid drug design and develop new therapeutic strategies

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Peter Hinterdorfer
Institut für Biophysik, Abteilung für Angewandte Experimentelle Biophysik
+43 732 2468 7631
peter.hinterdorfer@jku.at
http://www.jku.at/biophysics/
For details please contact the responsible scientist.
Toshio Ando (Univ. Kanazawa, Japan)
Preiner J. N. Kodera, J. Tang P. Hinterdorfer et al. IgGs are made for walking on bacterial and viral surfaces. Nat Commun. 2014. 5 (Nr.4394).

Preiner, J., P. Hinterdorfer et al., High-speed AFM images of thermal motion provide stiffness map of interfacial membrane protein moieties. Nano letters, 2015.