Psycho- and neurolinguistic laboratory

University of Salzburg

Salzburg | Website

Core facility (CF)

Short Description

The devices of the core facility of the psycho- / neurolinguistic laboratory include a device for eye tracking (eye tracking; Eyelink 1000 System; SR Research) with a very high temporal and spatial resolution (2000Hz sampling rate; <0.5 ° accuracy), a 64-channel EEG System with active electrodes (Brain Products, ActiCHamp) for measuring brain waves (with a temporal resolution of 1000 Hz sampling rate), an 8x12 channel fNIRS system (NIRScout, NIRX) for measuring cortical blood flow (oxygen saturation) as an indicator for brain activity as well as various behavior-based ones Methods and paradigms (SAT procedure, self-paced reading, visual world paradigm, etc.) for the investigation of language comprehension processes.
The methods can be coupled (EEG electrodes and fNIRS optodes can be mounted in a hood) so that brain activation (EEG, fNIRS) and eye movements can be recorded at the same time.
In addition, the Core Facility has hardware dongle licenses for EEG analysis (Brain Vision Analyzer 2).
The devices enable the investigation of language understanding and language production processes in different modalities (spoken language, sign language).

Contact Person

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Dietmar Roehm

Research Services

Neurobiology of language
Predictive processing of language comprehension
Neural correlates of the processing of disturbed / undisturbed speech
Discourse processing
Sign Language Research
Interference in speech processing
Parafoveal processing while reading
Fixation-corrected brain potentials
Combined measurement of EEG, NIRS and eye movements
Language comprehension and language development in children with cochlear implant

Methods & Expertise for Research Infrastructure

The combination of theoretical, experimental and clinical linguistics with cognitive and neuroscience leads to a deeper understanding of human language ability and allows comprehensive insights into the brain processes and structures involved in language understanding. By using the methods EEG, NIRS, eye movement measurement, in combination with behavioral measures (e.g. acceptability, reaction time, language tests) and clinical procedures (e.g. voice field measurement), research into language on a cognitive and neurobiological level is made possible. The resulting findings form the basis for modeling linguistic / cognitive processes.

The psycho- / neurolinguistic laboratory covers the following areas of application:

a) Language processing (phonetic, written and sign language processing): Language processing as a psycho- / neurolinguistic discipline comprises the areas of syntax processing, lexical access (semantics) and pragmatics. As a neurolinguistic discipline, language comprehension is explored under the influence of acquired and developmental disorders. In addition, language comprehension / language processing in children as well as in demented and elderly people is examined.
The “Neurobiology of Language” working group deals with the neurobiological foundations of language processing, taking into account all linguistic levels (phonetics, lexicons, syntax, semantics, discourse).


b) L2 / L3 language acquisition in children and adults *: bilingualism (code switching; effect of bilingualism on cognitive functions); Multilingualism (morpho- / syntactic transfer and neurocognitive correlates); Language learning processes (evidence-based methods for L2 / L3 teaching; instructed L2 / 3 acquisition; research-based grammar intervention)
(* In cooperation with Assoc.-Prof. Dr. Tanja Angelovska, University of Salzburg)

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Dietmar Roehm
Fachbereich Linguistik
0043 662 8044 4271
dietmar.roehm@sbg.ac.at
https://www.plus.ac.at/linguistik/
Please contact us via science.plus@sbg.ac.at, or contact the responsible person for this section, mentioned in the contact field
Center for Cognitive Neuroscience Salzburg (CCNS), University of Salzburg
Inter-faculty department for sport and movement sciences, University of Salzburg
Department of Psychology, University of Salzburg
Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University (USA)
Center for Cognitive and Systems Neuroscience, University of South Australia (Australia)
The Center for Applied English Studies, University of Hong Kong (China)
Brain & Cognition Lab, Texas A&M University (USA)
Language Acquisition, Multilingualism, & Cognition (LAM-C) Laboratory, Wilfrid Laurier University (Canada)
Department of English, National Taiwan Normal University (Taiwan)
Language processing as a precursor to language change: evidence from Icelandic.
2020
Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, I., Roehm, D., Mailhammer, R., & Schlesewsky, M.
Frontiers in Psychology, section Language Sciences.
https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.03013

Uncovering transfer effects of dominance and proficiency in L3 English acquisition using the visual moving window paradigm and grammaticality judgments
2020
Angelovska, T., Roehm, D., & Weinmüller, S.
Applied Linguistics Review (published online ahead of print 2020, open access),000010151520190075.
https://doi.org/10.1515/applirev-2019-0075

Processing instruction effects regardless of input modality and developmental processing constraints?
2020
Angelovska, T., & Roehm, D.
A school lab classroom study on the morphosyntactic acquisition of L2 English. Instructed Second Language Acquisition, 4(2), 180–202. https://doi.org/10.1558/isla.40640

Neurolinguistic Implications for L2 Learning and Teaching.
2020
Angelovska, T. & Roehm, D.
In: The TESOL Encyclopedia of English Language Teaching (eds J.I. Liontas, T. International Association and M. DelliCarpini).
https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118784235.eelt0956.pub2

Distributional properties of an agreement marker in Austrian Sign Language (ÖGS)
2020
Krebs, J., Wilbur, R.B. & Roehm, D.
Linguistics, 58(4), 1151-1194.
https://doi.org/10.1515/ling-2020-0159

Psycholinguistic mechanisms of classifier processing in sign language.
2020
Krebs, J., Malaia, E., Wilbur, R.B. & Roehm, D.
Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition.
https://doi.org/10.1037/xlm0000958

Age of sign language acquisition has lifelong effect on syntactic preferences in sign language users.
2020
Krebs, J., Malaia, E., Wilbur, R.B. & Roehm, D.
International Journal of Behavioral Development.
https://doi.org/10.1177/0165025420958193

Subjektpräferenz in der Österreichischen Gebärdensprache (ÖGS). Das Zeichen.
2020
Krebs, J., Malaia, E., Wilbur, R.B., & Roehm, D.
Zeitschrift für Sprache und Kultur Gehörloser, 114, 96-107.

Interaction between topic marking and subject preference strategy in sign language processing.
2020
Krebs, J., Malaia, E., Wilbur, R.B. & Roehm, D
Language, Cognition and Neuroscience, 35(4), 466-484.
https://doi.org/10.1080/23273798.2019.1667001

Age of acquisition effects differ across linguistic domains in sign language: EEG evidence.
2020
Malaia, E., Krebs, J. & Roehm, D. & Wilbur, R.B.
Brain & Language, 200, 104708.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104708

Neurolinguistic accounts of L2 learning and teaching
2019
Roehm, D. & Angelovska, T.
In J. I. Liontas (Ed.), TESOL encyclopedia of English language teaching updates. Hoboken. NJ: Wiley.
https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118784235.eelt0956

Interaction between topic marking and subject preference strategy in sign language processing
2019
Krebs, J., Malaia, E., Wilbur, R.B. & Roehm, D.
Language, Cognition and Neuroscience. 1-19.
https://doi.org/10.1080/23273798.2019.1667001

Looking forward does not mean forgetting about the past: ERP evidence for the interplay of predictive coding and interference during language processing.
2019
Schoknecht, P., Roehm, D., Schlesewsky, M., & Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, I.
bioRxiv 567560. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/567560

Age of acquisition effects differ across lingu- istic domains in sign language: EEG evidence
2019
Malaia, E., Krebs, J. & Roehm, D. Wilbur, R.B. (2019).
Brain & Language, 200, 104708.
doi: https://10.1016/j.- bandl.2019.104708

The impact of transitional movements and non-manual markings on the disambiguation of locally ambiguous argument structures in Austrian Sign Language (ÖGS)
2019
Krebs, J., Wilbur, R. B., Alday, P. M., & Roehm, D.
Language and Speech, 62(4), 652-680.
https://doi.org/10.1177/0023830918801399

Subject preference emerges as cross-modal strategy for linguistic processing.
2018
Krebs, J., Malaia, E., Wilbur, R.B., & Roehm, D.
Brain Research, 1691, 105-117.
doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2018.03.029.

The impact of transitional movements and non-manual markings on the disambiguation of locally ambiguous argument structures in Austrian Sign Language (ÖGS)
2018
Krebs, J., Wilbur, R.B., Alday, P.M. & Roehm, D.
Language and Speech, Vol. 62(4), 652 –680.
doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/0023830918801399.

The costs of being certain: Brain potential evidence for linguistic preactivation in sentence processing
2017
Freunberger, D. & Roehm, D.
Psychophysiology, 54, 824-832.
https://doi.org/10.1111/psyp.12848.

Psycho-/Neurolinguistik: Neuronale Korrelate der Verarbeitung grammatischer Variation. In: Konopka, Marek / Wöllstein, Angelika (Hrsg.): Grammatische Variation Empirische Zugänge und theoretische Modellierung.
2017
Roehm, Dietmar
Jahrbuch des Instituts für Deutsche Sprache 2016. XVI/356 S. - Berlin / Boston: de Gruyter, 2017. S. 161-178.
https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110518214-011.

Two agreement markers in Austrian Sign Language (ÖGS).
2017
Krebs, J., Wilbur, R., & Roehm, D. (2017).
Sign Language & Linguistics, 20(1), 27 –54.
https://doi.org/10.1075/sll.20.1.02kre.

Wie Wörter Wellen werden. Die Untersuchung von Sprachverarbeitung mittels EEG. In: Konopka, Marek / Wöllstein, Angelika (Hrsg.): Grammatische Variation Empirische Zugänge und theoretische Modellierung
2017
Freunberger, D. (2017).
Jahrbuch des Instituts für Deutsche Sprache 2016. XVI/356 S. - Berlin / Boston: de Gruyter.
https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110518214-017.